promoting cultural heritage and conservation

Posts tagged “twitter

Rome around the world #romeawayfromrome

465653c2c31e11e28dba22000a1f97e5_7-1

Lincoln Center, New York. Photo by @Introvertmind

You don’t have to cross the Atlantic,  meander your way through Europe nor head westward on the Orient Express to catch a glimpse of Rome.  The empire’s inheritance to the world can be seen in modern and contemporary architecture in almost every town and city across the globe. We are always on the look out for imperial garland detail on a window,  a forum in a shopping mall or a full-fledged coliseum/library/sports complex.  Thank you for helping us find some Rome away from Rome wherever you are.  Please keep it up– we are building a great gallery of “Roman” architecture which you can see on Statigr.am.

And thank you, Instagram photographers @Introvertmind, @NYRoamer, @Parisinfourmonths, @saman_mt,  Twitter @bjrich09 and Vine @Moscerina for tagging your photos #romeawayfromrome (more…)


We dig Rome: AIRC on Youtube

We dig Rome and we like sharing it, so in 2009 we created an AIRC account on Youtube:  WeDigRome where we upload AIRC-produced filmettes about our programs (inluding our summer excavation and full-immersion Latin) and our documentary projects such as Fasti Online and upcoming Digging History.

Our latest videos are Unlisted 2013: Conversation for Conservation, our annual cultural heritage conference.  If you were not able to attend the conference, take a look in our recently uploaded videos where we feature each Unlisted2013 speaker.


How Latin and Twitter helped a Journalist

Pope Chirri

They are calling it “the tweet heard around the world”, a less than 140-character message by ANSA journalist Giovanna Chirri that announced to resignation of Pope Benedict XVI. “B16 si ‘e dimesso. Lascia pontificato dal 28 febbraio” [B16 is stepping down. Leaving on February 28.] The news itself is beyond spectacular.  As Papal history fans will note, Pope Benedict XVI will be the first pontiff to voluntarily resign since Gregory XII in 1415. Yes, nearly 600 year ago. And how this news was not just conveyed [Chirri's social media short-hand] but understood is just as spectacular.  Chirri, part of a papal audience on Monday, February 11, listened to the Pope’s Latin declaration,

Quapropter bene conscius ponderis huius actus plena libertate declaro me ministerio Episcopi Romae, Successoris Sancti Petri, mihi per manus Cardinalium die 19 aprilis MMV commissum renuntiare ita ut a die 28 februarii MMXIII, hora 29, sedes Romae, sedes Sancti Petri vacet et Conclave ad eligendum novum Summum Pontificem ab his quibus competit convocandum esse.” [For this reason, and well aware of the seriousness of this act, with full freedom I declare that I renounce the ministry of Bishop of Rome, Successor of Saint Peter, entrusted to me by the Cardinals on 19 April 2005, in such a way, that as from 28 February 2013, at 20:00 hours, the See of Rome, the See of Saint Peter, will be vacant and a Conclave to elect the new Supreme Pontiff will have to be convoked by those whose competence it is.]

She confirmed with ANSA what she had heard, posted her tweet, and from there, the deluge.  Journalists quickly caught on, and began spreading the news, along with speculation as to why.  Chirri has quickly become a superstar both journalistically and linguistically.   Not only was she the very first to get the scoop on history-making news, she quickly followed up her tweet with another stating “the Pope’s Latin is very easy to understand”, an inadvertent shout-out to supporters of Latin language and its studies in academic institutions across the globe.  Optime, Iohanna!

Thanks to Chirri’s great use of Latin, a once “useless” language proves ever relevant in the real world and Latin’s lasting legacy continues to shine bright and clear.  It is opportune to note that there are many opportunities to study Latin around the world but very few to speak it and we are proud to support Latin and its uses in daily life and contemporary media by studying Latin in a contemporary and living environment.   Rome is the ideal city- as the city is literally covered in Latin inscriptions– and now with the world scrutinizing Vatican Ctiy for the coming months, it is a great opportunity to re-examine Latin’s role in contemporary society.

Pope Benedict XVI announces his resignation [VIDEO and below photo, The Guardian, February 11, 2012]

Click here for Official transcript

Pope Benedict XVI


Habemus @Pontifex! Pipiatio Latina: What will you tweet the Pope #LTNL

Shortly after  Cardinal Gianfranco Ravasi announced on twitter and in Latin the Pontifical Academy for Latin Studies,  the Vatican announced that Pope Benedict XVI will begin tweeting on December 12 as @Pontifex, perhaps the best handle to appear on Twitter in years.  We are excited that @Pontifex will be flexing the papal fingers to comment in no less than eight languages: English, Italian, German, French, Portuguese, Polish, Arabic and Spanish (each under language-specific Twitter accounts).

pontifex

Since only a few tweets will be hand-picked and then responded to by @Pontifex,  our upcoming Latin tweet up will focus on Quid pipies Romano Pontifici?  So for the next few days think about what you would tweet the Pope and then join in to Pipiatio Latina #LTNL Tuesday, December 11 at 3 pm Pacific/ 6pm Eastern Standard.

Pipiatio Latina is led by Dr. Nancy Llewellyn, Associate Professor of Latin at Wyoming Catholic College.  To participate, submit tweets to Nancy @RomeontheRange and @AIRomanculture, or send us questions/comments in advance  to info@romanculture.org.  Whether simply following or ready to engage in some chatter, look for hash tags: #LTNL and #LatinTweetUp and remember to add either or both of them to your tweets. We’ve also customized a TweetGrid so that you can follow the hashtags and our account at the same time.

Thanks for helping to promote Latin in the real and virtual worlds!

For a glimpse into Latin in action, please take a look at our Summer 2012 “Living Latin, Living History in Rome” program videos.


Happy Birthday, Augustus!

august

September 23, 63 BC . . .  and here’s how we celebrated . . .

Love,

AIRC

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


That’s a Wrap: Living Latin videos on YouTube

7739213372_dc3d0f3272_b

Salve! We wanted to share a peek into our Summer 2012′s “Living Latin, Living History in Rome” summer program led by Prof. Nancy Llewellyn of Wyoming Catholic College.  Nancy, an expert in spoken Latin practice and pedagogy, brought students in and out of Rome in an almost completely spoken Latin environment, and she was kind of enough to enjoy a bit of educational paparazzi.

The following links are for two videos produced by AIRC. T his summer, we followed Nancy and class — and had a great time, of course!  We hope  you do as well, and continue to spread the word[s] on living Latin.

  1. Overview of the program experience, showing the on-site readings, guest lectures, classroom exercises, and excursions that make this program unique and a must for any student who wants to understand Latin at the deepest level.
  2. Interview with Prof. Llewellyn in which she explains how she became involved with spoken Latin and why learning to speak the language is so important for anyone who works extensively with it.


Pipiatio Latina: Gladiatores et Scripta Parietalia #LTNL

IMG_3364

We’re back and we are all about men waving swords and dirty walls. Pipiatio Latina wants to talk about gladiatores et scripta parietalia.

What would Rome be without its meandering gladiators (not to mention their creative centurion cousins) and thought-provoking graffiti?  In April, the Comune di Rome tried to answer at least part of the question with a city-sponsored clean up.  What followed was war.

Just like the gladiators, Pipiatio Latina wants a free-for-all dialogue on Rome’s gladiators and graffiti . . . in Latin, of course!

When: Wednesday, May 9 at 6 pm EST

Host:  American Institute for Roman Culture,  Dr. Nancy Llewellyn

Where:   Twitter – Search for hashtag #LTNL (primary) and #LatinTweetUp

How:   Check out our customized TweetGrid  to send tweets (You will need to bookmark LTNL tweet grid page and login with your twitter account when ready to tweet.) Follow the aforementioned hashtags and @AIRomanculture.  (You can also put your acount name in place of @AIRomanculture). Or load your Twitter page and search for #TweetLatin and #LatinTweetup for the 60 minutes of the event.

Participate:  Send us questions/comments in advance so we can feature them in the #LatinTweetup.  During the tweet up, get chatty and make sure to use hashtags #LatinTweetup or #tweetlatin within your Tweet so everyone can see your question, answer, contribution, etc.

Not on Twitter?: You can still use the TweetGrid  to follow the conversation.  Though you will not be able to contribute to the discussion, you can follow all commentary.

Contact:  @AIRomanculture, email:  info@romanculture.org

Follow us on Twitter also at @SaveRome and join us on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/airc.rome and http://www.facebook.com/romanculture

Graffiti photo: Mr.Jennings


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,560 other followers